Why Choose a Career as a Personal Trainer?

Amy O’Mahony, Operations Manager and Elite Personal Trainer at Rogue Fitness, Continual Professional Development Tutor at Rogue Institute talks about why she loves her job…     Throughout my life I have found myself gravitating towards exercise and fitness as a hobby, which I am fortunate to say has developed as both a passion and a career. I consider myself extremely lucky to have grown up experiencing and competing in a range of sports – from swimming to GAA & orienteering, which has led to my commitment to helping others find the path to fitness that suits them, be it lifting weights at the gym, getting a sweat on in fitness classes, climbing mountains or swimming seas! Becoming a Personal Trainer provided a career path and a platform for me to help people feel confident in their own abilities and inspired to take on anything. On a personal level I am continually reminded and grateful for the positive effects exercise has on my own physical and psychological well-being, and constantly look for opportunities to develop and further my knowledge of the human body and it’s astounding capabilities. I am both excited and proud of all of the opportunities and avenues a career in Personal Training has lead me to, and look forward to continuing to help people to push their limits, surpass their expectations and perform at their very best, whatever their best may...

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What should you look for from a Fitness Education Provider?

When choosing a fitness education provider, there are a number of elements you need to consider. While you want the freedom and flexibility to fit study into your lifestyle, you also want the security of knowing you’re backed by an industry-preferred qualification. Make the right decision by ensuring your chosen fitness education provider delivers the accredited courses. Nationally and Internationally accredited courses are guaranteed to meet an established industry standard. In the fitness sphere, this means that the theory and practical education you receive is met by industry standards and that you receive a qualification upon graduation. If you’re looking at becoming a Personal Trainer, it’s extremely important to attain a nationally accredited qualification to enable you to work safely and professionally in a fitness environment. Here’s some of the key questions you should ask your Fitness Education Provider. Are the qualifications you provide nationally or internationally recognised? Who is the governing body which oversees qualification and teaching standards at your college? Are the qualifications you provide recognised on a national framework of qualifications? Will employers recognise the qualifications you provide? As a fitness professional will I be able to apply for public liability insurance with your qualification? What is the education and experience of your tutors? Are your teaching practices and marking schemes externally verified?   If your fitness education provider cannot answer all the above questions with a full and definite “YES”  …  You need to look elsewhere. For more information on Fitness Education and Standards contact our office info@rogueinstituteireland.com or call: 021 477...

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5 Initial steps towards analysing scientific ‘fact’!

A high protein diet can be as harmful as smoking 20 cigarettes a day……. Creatine killed Jonah Lomu……… We have all heard the headlines apparently based on legitimate studies and/or reports which have ‘proved’ these points beyond doubt. Firstly allow me to add a disclaimer: I am by no means saying that there is no truth whatsoever behind such headlines. However I feel it is important that we, as educated professionals, take a step back before we accept these statements as fact. The Rogue Institute is here to teach students how to interpret these statements so that they can, throughout their careers, recognise legitimate scientific research from ridiculous claims. I will keep the following guide specific to scientific studies and I remind the reader that it is only an introductory guide to analysing them and suggests a few questions we should ask before we condemn any supplement, food group or training methodology. Step 1: Recognise that no one study can prove anything categorically. With regard to science: the more we learn the less we know. For almost every study out there, we can find one which seemingly disproves its conclusions.  Research becomes widely accepted only when numerous studies have been conducted on various populations accounting for most conceivable variables using different methods.  Be aware that there are always variables. If the research is based on food diaries, what guarantee do we have that the participants didn’t forget something they ate? If it relies upon self-reporting of any kind the study can automatically be weakened. This is when meta-analyses can become very useful. A meta-analysis considers not just one study but the body of research in the area. A useful starting point is PubMed or Medline, when looking for such. Meta-analyses consider the conclusions of all or most peer-reviewed, published studies in one area and statistically analyse their conclusions to establish validity or lack thereof. These can be hugely useful when determined whether or not you should advocate a certain course of action to clients. Ketogenic dieting is a prime example of a body of work seemingly advocating a considerably extreme type of diet not to mention counter- intuitive to some. However it should be noted that many of the studies in the area are done on clinical populations including participants with conditions like obesity, epilepsy and diabetes. It is important to consider also the origin of the research idea in the first instance. The ketogenic diet for example was originally used in the treatment of epilepsy and in more recent years its efficacy has been considered on other populations. The origins of the research area is often an important...

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Obesity and Diabetes On The Rise

The startling facts right here at home show the rise in obesity accounts for 31% of the anticipated increase in diabetes in the Republic of Ireland.  It is estimated that about 70% of adults and about 24% of children and teens are now either overweight or obese.  According to the Irish Heart Foundation, 27 lives are lost to heart disease and stroke every day in Ireland. Our country is in the worst shape in its history.   “Overweight” is clinically defined by a Body Mass Index (BMI) — a measure relating height and weight — of 25 to 29.9, and “obese” by a BMI of 30 and above.   Recent figures predict 89 per cent of Irish men and 85 per cent of Irish women will be overweight or obese by 2030, putting us at the top of an “overweight” table of 53 countries.   The prevalence of diabetes is currently at an all-time high in Ireland. Diabetes is a condition whereby, simply put, sugar is not properly absorbed by the body. There are two main categories of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes is a condition in which the body produces little or no insulin. This condition usually occurs in childhood or early adult life and requires treatment with daily insulin injections. It is caused by the body’s own immune system destroying the insulin making beta cells of the pancreas.   Type 2 diabetes usually develops in adulthood. It is diagnosed when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin (reduced insulin production or the cells of the body do not respond to insulin effectively (known as insulin resistance) Type 2 diabetes usually develops in adults over the age of 45 years but sadly,  is increasingly occurring in younger age groups including children, adolescents and young adults. The condition is more likely to occur in people with a family history of type 2 diabetes. For some, the first sign may be the most feared complication of diabetes; a heart attack, whereas others might be lucky enough to notice vision problems or a foot ulcer first. To find out more about chronic disease prevention through exercise and nutrition or for more information on the nutrition courses at Rogue Institute give the team a call on 021 4777538 Email info@rogueinstituteireland.com  or check out website www.rogueinstituteireland.com...

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How to become a Sports Therapist

Above every other skill-set, sports therapists are experts in deep tissue therapy.  It is a skill-set that the public desires in an age of machines, waiting lists, and the current ‘exercise and movement will fix everything’ trend. No matter how we may try to re-brand sports therapy, the public’s perception of  a sports therapist, whether they happen to be Physical Therapists or Physiotherapists, Osteopaths, Neuromuscular Therapists, Manipulative Therapists, Sports rehabilitators or Athletic Therapists etc, is best described as a sports masseuse. And rightly so, event massage is a common thread on match day, or the day of an energetic stage performance or before, during or after a walk, run or race. Guess what?.….nobody does it better! Gone are the days when the kitman, manager or coach would rub some mixture of cooking oil and menthol based cream on an athlete’s ‘tight hamstrings’ because of a lack of better options. Within the FAI league of Ireland or Club or County level GAA, the first aider is usually a fully qualified, registered and insured sports massage therapist of some stripe. And it is through the necessity for event first aid that a sports therapist gets their foot in the door either with a team or sporting organisation. Which means that sports first aid is a must. Due to the fact that it also has to be re-certified every two years and the qualification can be attained in a few days this is where a budding sports massage therapist should start. Once in the door, that therapist now has the opportunity to wow both athletes and backroom team with their event massage skills which, when administered properly can be an effective tool in sports psychology strategies, enhance lymphatic drainage, increase synovial joint fluid and hyluronic acid to facilitate tissue gliding and resist premature fatigue, as well as a chance to assess each and every athlete’s state of readiness and general subjective well-being before during and after the event. Due to this the sports massage therapist will be the natural source of advice about injury, discomfort and pain for the athlete. The Sports massage therapist will, screen the athlete thoroughly, assess them both subjective and objectively through movement analysis and palpation and will then plan and apply a complex treatment that may involve deep tissue therapy, neuromuscular techniques and specific exercise / movements. So a reputable qualification is a must to ensure not only that the athlete is in safe and effective hands but that the sports massage therapist themselves is properly informed and therefore confident to give advice that won’t open them or their school, insurance company or association up to litigation. The level of...

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The Importance of Continual Professional Development

Continual Professional Development Credits (CPD) are important in all industries, but especially when working in the fast paced and ever changing world of fitness. It’s crucial to keep up to date with new trends and explore various coaching styles and methods to keep your business fresh, your clients happy and your knowledge current. Here’s a rundown of how CPD can help you: CPD ensures your capabilities keep pace with the current standards of others in the same field. CPD ensures that you maintain and enhance the knowledge and skills you need to deliver a professional service to your customers, clients and the community. CPD ensures that you and your knowledge stay relevant and up to date. You are more aware of the changing trends and directions in your profession. The pace of change is probably faster than it’s ever been – and this is a feature of the new normal that we live and work in. If you stand still you will get left behind, as the currency of your knowledge and skills becomes out-dated. CPD helps you continue to make a meaningful contribution to your team. You become more effective in the workplace. This assists you to advance in your career and move into new positions where you can lead, manage, influence, coach and mentor others. CPD helps you to stay interested and interesting.  Experience is a great teacher, but it does mean that we tend to do what we have done before.  Focused CPD opens you up to new possibilities, new knowledge and new skill areas. CPD can deliver a deeper understanding of what it means to be a professional, along with a greater appreciation of the implications and impacts of your work. At the Rogue Institute we run an array of workshops and courses all internationally recognised and accredited that contribute to your CPD portfolio. For more information on how we can enhance your knowledge and skills as a fitness professional and health mentor call Kelly on 021 477...

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